OM – The Supreme Word of the Eternal Unity – 2-9-14

Om-symbol

The yoga of works relies on turning all action into a sacrifice. But the esoteric sense of the outward action is based in the Oneness of all existence, where it is the Divine himself that carries out the sacrifice. A famous sloka of the Gita, frequently recited before taking food, conveys the sense of the integration of knowledge, works and devotion through the mystic Unity: “Brahman is the giving, Brahman is the food-offering, by Brahman it is offered into the Brahman fire, Brahman is that which is to be attained by Samadhi in Brahman-action.”

In the yoga of knowledge, the Divine is the knower, the knowledge and the object of knowledge. Knowledge is not intellectual, but experiential. The sacred Mantra carries the sound-body of the Divine and is the essence of knowledge. Sri Aurobindo describes this relationship: “The Mantra of the divine Consciousness brings its light of revelation, the Mantra of the divine Power its will of effectuation, the Mantra of the divine Ananda its equal fulfillment of the spiritual delight of existence. All word and thought are an outflowering of the great OM,–OM, the Word, the Eternal. Manifest in the forms of sensible objects, manifest in that conscious play of creative self-conception of which forms and objects are the figures, manifest behind in the self-gathered superconscient power of the Infinite, OM is the sovereign source, seed, womb of thing and idea, form and name,–it is itself, integrally, the supreme Intangible, the original Unity, the timeless Mystery self-existent above all manifestation in supernal being.”

There is a unification of the yoga of works, the yoga of knowledge and the yoga of devotion in the mystic revelation of OM.

OM has been described and lauded in the Upanishads and there are those who hold that OM is the secret sound of all the collective sounds of the entire Universe.

The Mandukya Upanishad defines it thus: “AUM,–A the spirit of the gross and external, Virat, U the spirit of the subtle and internal, Taijasa, M the spirit of the secret superconscient omnipotence, Prajna, OM the Absolute, Turiya”

Sri Aurobindo, Essays on the Gita, Second Series, Part I, Chapter 6, Works, Devotion and Knowledge, pp. 314-315

and

Sri Aurobindo, Bhagavad Gita and Its Message, page 82, Chapter IV, Sloka 24

http://sriaurobindostudies.wordpress.com/2014/02/09/om-the-supreme-word-of-the-eternal-unity/

Mysteries of the Cosmic OM – Ancient Vedic Science For A New Age

HermeticAlchemy·120 videos

A Documentary On Ancient Vedic Science For A New Age

In this documentary, which was over 3 months in the making, we explore deep themes of ancient Vedic esoteric science.. Ranging from consciousness, Kundalini, Chakras, to God, to sound and creation of the elements.. Cites numerous Tantras and Upanishads in support of it’s theories, establishes the truth of Vedanta and esoteric knowledge.

Alan Watts – OM – Sound of Love

Buddy Huggins·172 videos

Alan Watts- OM: Reading from Hindu Scriptures. All Credits to; Alan Watts and to his Son
http://www.alanwatts.net/watts.htm

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Wikipedia – Mantra

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Wikipedia – Mantra

A mantra is a sound, syllable, word, or group of words that is considered capable of “creating transformation” (cf. spiritual transformation).[1] Its use and type varies according to the school and philosophy associated with the mantra.[2]

Mantras (Devanāgarī मन्त्र) originated in the Vedic tradition of India, becoming an essential part of the Hindu tradition and a customary practice within Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism.

In the context of the Vedas, the term mantra refers to the entire portion which contains the texts called Rig, Yajur or Sama, that is, the metrical part as opposed to the prose Brahmana commentary. With the transition from ritualistic Vedic traditions to mystical and egalitarian Hindu schools of Yoga, Vedanta, Tantra and Bhakti, the orthodox attitude of the elite nature of mantra knowledge gave way to spiritual interpretations of mantras as a translation of the human will or desire into a form of action.

For the authors of the Hindu scriptures of the Upanishads, the syllable Om, itself constituting a mantra, represents Brahman, the godhead, as well as the whole of creation. Kūkai suggests that all sounds are the voice of the Dharmakaya Buddha — i.e. as in Hindu Upanishadic and Yogic thought, these sounds are manifestations of ultimate reality, in the sense of sound symbolism postulating that the vocal sounds of the mantra have inherent meaning independent of the understanding of the person uttering them.

Nevertheless, such understanding of what a mantra may symbolize or how it may function differs throughout the various traditions and also depends on the context in which it is written or sounded. In some instances there are multiple layers of symbolism associated with each sound, many of which are specific to particular schools of thought. For an example of such see the syllable: Om which is central to both Hindu and Buddhist traditions.

While Hindu tantra eventually came to see the letters as well as the sounds as representatives of the divine, the shift toward writing occurred when Buddhism traveled to China. Although China lacked a unifying, ecclesiastic language like Sanskrit, China achieved its cultural unity through a written language with characters that were flexible in pronunciation but more precise in meaning. The Chinese prized written language much more highly than did the Indian Buddhist missionaries, and the writing of mantras became a spiritual practice in its own right. So that whereas Brahmins had been very strict on correct pronunciation, the Chinese, and indeed other Far-Eastern Buddhists were less concerned with this than correctly writing something down. The practice of writing mantras, and copying texts as a spiritual practice, became very refined in Japan, and the writing in the Siddham script in which the Sanskrit of many Buddhist Sutras were written is only really seen in Japan nowadays. However, written mantra-repetition in Hindu practices, with Sanskrit in any number of scripts, is well-known to many sects in India as well.

Robert Slap – Eternal OM – Mandala of Golden Buddha

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